Dissertation Proposal Models

Sample Research Proposals

Review the following sample research proposals.  As you review each, consider how each element in the proposal is described and explained by the researcher, consider what is included, in what order it is shared, and how elements are combined.  Also consider what is omitted, and/or what new elements are included that have not previously been studied in class.  Lastly, consider how the researcher composed the proposal with an audience in mind, and what elements of the proposal work to persuade that audience.

As you review the proposals, select ones that are in your field of study AND ones that are of interest to you.  Keep track of and reflect on what you have using Reflection: Reviewing Sample Proposals.  This will help you to complete your Reflection Journal entry, where you will begin to make some decisions about what you found effective, what you liked, or what you have decided NOT to do in your own proposal.

Making it clear why you are doing this research. Proving that you have a solid basis upon which to suggest further investigation of your topic, and highlighting what you hope to gain from carrying it out, means that you are justifying your work in this area and the contribution that you will make to your field.

Outlining your aims and objectives is a way to mitigate any claims that you are completing your research for some ‘self-serving’ purpose; integrity and value should be upheld throughout your proposal, planning, research, and writing phases.

Anyone involved at any stage of your research, whether directly included as a participant or not, should be well-informed about the reasons for your work, and the way that their ‘data’ will be incorporated and used in your eventual paper. Participants should be made aware of their participation and should be told exactly what to expect, what is expected from them and what the ‘risks’ of their involvement are. Planning to utilise a ‘consent form’ and providing participants with a ‘fact sheet’ reminding them of this information, would be a good way of making sure that you have covered all bases.

Confidentiality and anonymity are central to research participation, and it is your duty as a researcher to do everything in your power to ensure that your participants can not be identified within your work and that their information is protected and/or encrypted whilst in your possession. Using pseudonyms such as ‘Person A’ and ‘Person B’ can be helpful in writing up and labelling your transcripts.

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